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Water Smart Cotton and Grains

Water Smart Cotton and Grains is a water use efficiency project that improved knowledge transfer and built capacity within these industries to adopt best irrigation practice.

It followed on from the achievements of the ‘Knowledge Management in Irrigated Cotton and Grains’ and ‘Advancing Water Management in NSW’ projects to further improve water use efficiency within the cotton and grains industries.

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Water Smart Cotton and Grains

Case Study

This case study looks at benchmarking irrigation and how it can improve decisions and profitability on Cotton farms using the Watertrack Rapid Tool.

Water Use Efficiency

Land & Water Australia Key Learnings Factsheet

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Water Use Efficiency

Improving water use efficiency has been a driving force for government and commercial endeavours for several decades but the term can mean different things to different people. For example, to governments water use efficiency may be a key to optimising production from water resources, while for irrigators it may contribute to optimal profit for their business.

Water, soil and salt movement from sustainable salt-tolerant pastures in NSW

Sustainable Grazing of Saline Lands

Summarises the research findings of this project.

Watering wetlands

panel discussion

Audio file from the panel discussion for the Watering wetlands hard copy publication

Watering wetlands, Impediments and challenges to the transfer of knowledge between wetland managers and scientists

The degradation of Australia’s wetlands has brought into sharp focus the need to manage factors such as altered flow and water regimes. Exchanging knowledge between wetland managers and wetland scientists and putting knowledge into practice is an essential part of this management. Yet environmental watering of wetlands is a relatively new type of intervention, especially where engineering infrastructure is used. It is largely restricted to south eastern Australia. Thus, while there is (more)...

Waterwheel Newsletter 10

In this issue:

  • Focus on WA
  • NPIRD news
  • A new way to save water and nutrients
  • National Irrigation Science Network up and running

Waterwheel Newsletter 11

Inside this issue:

  • Focus on WA
  • NPIRD news
  • A new way to save water and nutrients
  • National Irrigation Science Network up and running

Waterwheel Newsletter 12

In this issue:

  • Focus on Namoi Valley
  • NPIRD news
  • Water savings of up to 50% with PRD
  • National irrigation code project
  • Irrigation diary

Waterwheel Newsletter 13

In this issue:

  • Focus on Shepparton Irrigation Region
  • Irrigation a risky business: Study findings
  • New NPIRD projects

Waterwheel Newsletter 14

In this issue:

  • Focus on the Condamine-Balonne
  • Feature on soilwater monitoring
  • Reducing erosion and increasing infiltration with PAM

Waterwheel Newsletter 15

In this issue:

  • Focus on Murray Irrigation Limited Area
  • Burdekin groundwater sustainability initiative
  • Water use efficiency -what does it mean
  • Dates for your diary

Waterwheel Newsletter 16

In this issue:

  • Focus on Southern Rural Water
  • New sustainable irrigation program
  • Project update
  • PRD makes Top 100

Ways to Improve Soil Structure and Productivity of Irrigated Agriculture

Extensive work on soil structure by researcher Dr Bruce Cockroft from Northern Victoria has brought the maintenance of soil structure into the spotlight as a promising area for irrigators to work on to improve their yields. An overview of Cockroft’s research has been prepared by Dr Rob Murray at the University of Adelaide for the National Program for Sustainable Irrigation.

Weather drivers in Queensland

Communicating Climate Change

The climate of Australia varies across many different regions and timescales. Here we introduce the major elements that affect the weather and climate of Queensland. The driving force behind our weather is the general circulation of the atmosphere, caused by unequal heating of the Earth’s surface. Energy from the sun causes evaporation from tropical oceans and uneven heating of land and sea surfaces. An extensive area of high pressure, known as the sub-tropical ridge, is a (more)...

Weather drivers in South Australia

Communicating Climate Change - Module 1

The driving force behind our weather is the general circulation of the atmosphere, caused by unequal heating of the Earth’s surface. Energy from the sun causes uneven heating of land and sea surfaces near the equator and evaporation from tropical oceans. An extensive area of high pressure, known as the sub-tropical ridge, is a major feature of the general circulation of our atmosphere. It is a major influence on the climate of southern Australia. The position of the ridge varies with (more)...